food, recipes

Hot Cross Buns

So much tastier than store bought ones — try it for yourself!

There’s still time to make something special for Good Friday and Easter. These pastries were easy to find when I lived near Chicago. In Appalachia, it’s easier to make them myself.

The link includes a recipe and a bit of cross-pastry history. πŸ™‚ Have a blessed holiday!!

I didn’t realize this until doing this food story, but cross-related breads made all over the world are often loaded with spices and bitter elements such as orange zest. The bitter represents the sorrow of the cross, the spices are a nod to the ones used for Jesus’s burial.

18 thoughts on “Hot Cross Buns”

  1. Nora, as soon as I read the title my mind immediately went to the nursery rhyme. Your article expanded my knowledge from the nursery rhyme level to the religious history of the bun. It’s fascinating how certain foods are associated with different religious holidays. In my Pennsylvania Dutch hometown, Shrove Tuesday was fastnacht day. The teachers of our Mennonite school would treat us to special donuts made only once of year on that day to mark the beginning of Lent the next day. I can’t find fastnachts here in Virginia but I can find hot cross buns. Maybe I need to consider making them a part of our Easter tradition.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Mmmm. Those donuts sound wonderful!

      Another treat I can’t seem to find anymore is a butter lamb. In the Chicago area, they were sold — at least during my childhood — in all the stores. All they were was butter pressed into a lamb-shaped mold, but they were so cute. Have a blessed holiday weekend!!

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s